genus Lycopersicon
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genus Lycopersicon an historical, biological, and taxonomic survey of the wild and cultivated tomatoes by Leonard C. Luckwill

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Published by The University Press in Aberdeen .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Lycopersicon.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Leonard C. Luckwill.
SeriesAberdeen University studies,, no. 120
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQK495.S7 L8
The Physical Object
Pagination44 p.
Number of Pages44
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6471023M
LC Control Number44019350
OCLC/WorldCa6219920

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Lycopersicon is a genus which included tomatoes and some species of nightshades. First removed from the genus Solanum by Philip Miller in , its removal leaves the latter genus paraphyletic, so modern botanists usually accept the names in Solanum. The name Lycopersicon is still used by gardeners, farmers, and seed e issues: Many. Abstract. The Andean region is the center of origin of the genus Lycopersicon, and it is generally believed that the first domestication of the tomato occurred in probably, the wild cherry tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. cerasiforme) was transported to Mexico from uently, during the 16th century, it was spread widely to Asian, Pacific and European countries, as well Cited by: Lycopersicon was a genus in the flowering plant family Solanaceae (the nightshades and relatives). It contained about 13 species in the tomato group of nightshades. First removed from the genus Solanum by Philip Miller in , its removal leaves the latter genus paraphyletic, so modern botanists generally accept the names in Solanum. Buy The genus Lycopersicon;: An historical, biological, and taxonomic survey of the wild and cultivated tomatoes, (Aberdeen University studies) by Luckwill, Leonard C (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Leonard C Luckwill.

  1. Introduction. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is one of the most important and popular fruit vegetable in the is a self-pollinated annual crop and belongs to the family Solanaceae with chromosome number 2n = 2x = 24 (Jenkins, , Peralta et al., ).The phylogenetic classification of the family Solanaceae has recently revised and the genus Lycopersicon .   The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) (Fig. 1) and its wild relatives (genus Solanum, section Lycopersicon) originated in western South America . New nomenclature for Lycopersicon. Kindly provided by Prof. Sandra Knapp, Natural History Museum, London, UK. (see also the Solanaceae Source PBI Solanum web resource). Species list for Solanum section Lycopersicum and allies - the "Tomato clade" (with equivalents in the previously recognized genus Lycopersicon, now part of a monophyletic Solanum); please cite this information as coming . Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. The genus Lycopersicon; an historical, biological, and taxonomic survey of the wild and cultivated tomatoes in SearchWorks catalog.

Tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller (2n = 2x = 24), is one of the most important vegetable crops of Solanaceae grown all over the world. It is a native of South America and Mexico. It is an important source of minerals, vitamins, and health acids. This chapter reviews the origin and history of the tomato. • The Introduction provides background information about tomato botany and culture, seed production and quality assurance, and container production of transplants. Among the new topics addressed are the change in nomenclature, in which the genus Lycopersicon was classified as Solanum section Lycopersicon, and the sequencing of the tomato genome. The wild tomato group Solanum Section Lycopersicon contains both self-incompatible and self-compatible taxa. In addition to several transitions from SI to SC that are well documented (Igic et al. Peralta et al. () list this genus as a synonym with "Amatula flava Medikus [=Solanum lycopersicum L.]" as its type, but fail to cite a typification authority .